The beautiful purple-and-white flower was originally grown by J.V. Laird, a member of the Tarleton faculty from 1941 until his retirement in 1974. Laird served as supervisor of the horticulture farm and as chairman of the agriculture department." property="og:description"/>
The beautiful purple-and-white flower was originally grown by J.V. Laird, a member of the Tarleton faculty from 1941 until his retirement in 1974. Laird served as supervisor of the horticulture farm and as chairman of the agriculture department." />
The beautiful purple-and-white flower was originally grown by J.V. Laird, a member of the Tarleton faculty from 1941 until his retirement in 1974. Laird served as supervisor of the horticulture farm and as chairman of the agriculture department." name="twitter:description"/> Skip to page content
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Blooming with spirit
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Tarleton State University-FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 22, 2010



With just a little effort now, flowerbeds could be blooming with Tarleton State University pride by spring. The university's horticulture center will sell "Tarleton Irises" during its normal sale hours, Friday, Sept. 24 from 12:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Rhizomes sell for $1 each.

The beautiful purple-and-white flower was originally grown by J.V. Laird, a member of the Tarleton faculty from 1941 until his retirement in 1974. Laird served as supervisor of the horticulture farm and as chairman of the agriculture department.

"He spent many hours crossbreeding plants to come up with just the right colors," recalled former Tarleton President W.O. Trogdon in a back issue of the Stephenville Empire-Tribune.

According to Trogdon, Laird experimented with hundreds of types of irises to produce the unique flower. The iris is still seen in bloom around campus, thanks to the continuing efforts of the horticulture center and Tarleton landscapists. The flower can also be seen in multiple yards around the city of Stephenville.

According to Manon Shockey, horticulture center manager, autumn is the best time to plant the flowers, which will bloom in the spring.

"Rhizomes typically produce one flower, but they spread out," Shockey said. "It takes less than you might think to fill a flowerbed."

There is a limited supply of Tarleton irises, and sales will be limited to 20 per customer.

The horticulture center is located on Washington Street next to the baseball field. For more information, contact Shockey at (254) 968-9208 or shockey@tarleton.edu.

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Tarleton State University
A member of The Texas A&M University System since 1917



Marketing & Communications Department
Coby Kestner, Communications Specialist
Phone: 254-968-9553
E-mail: kestner@tarleton.edu 

Address: Box T-0840, Stephenville, Texas 76402

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