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Invited Speakers

Dr. Ed Burger

Dr. Ed Burger

Dr. Edward Burger is President of Southwestern University as well as an educational and business consultant on thinking, innovation, and creativity. He has delivered over 700 addresses worldwide at venues including The Smithsonian Institution, Microsoft Corporation, The World Bank, The International Monetary Fund, the U.S. Department of the Interior, The New York Public Library, and the National Academy of Sciences. He is the author of over 70 research articles, books, and video series (starring in over 4,000 on-line videos). His most recent book, Making Up Your Own Mind: Thinking Effectively through Creative Puzzle-Solving, was just published by Princeton University Press. Burger was awarded the 2001 MAA Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo National Award for Distinguished Teaching of Mathematics. The MAA also named him their 2001-2003 Polya Lecturer. In 2004 he was awarded the MAA Chauvenet Prize, and in 2006 he was a recipient of the MAA Lester R. Ford Prize. In 2006, Reader's Digest listed Burger in their annual " 100 Best of America " as America's Best Math Teacher. In 2010 he was named the winner of the Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching — the largest prize in higher education teaching across all disciplines in the English speaking world. Also in 2010, he starred in a mathematics segment for NBC-TV on the Today Show; that appearance earned him a 2010 Telly Award. The Huffington Post named him one of their 2010 Game Changers: HuffPost's Game Changers salutes 100 innovators, visionaries, mavericks, and leaders who are reshaping their fields and changing the world. In 2012, Microsoft Worldwide Education selected him as one of their "Global Heroes in Education." In 2013, Burger was inducted as an inaugural Fellow of the American Mathematical Society. In 2014, Burger was elected to The Philosophical Society of Texas. Today he has a weekly, lively program on higher education and thinking produced by NPR's Austin affiliate KUT. The series is aptly called Higher ED, and the episodes are available on KUT's website or on iTunes.

Presentation

Making Up Your Own Mind through Practices of (Mathematical) Effective Thinking

Here's a Puzzle: How can we impactfully engage and uplift our students to thrive in their math courses and beyond? How can we inspire our students to see the beauty and power of mathematical thinking? Here we will offer some practical strategies of thinking that will allow our students to not only make greater meaning of mathematics, but apply those mindful practices beyond their math classes to enhance the rest of their lives. We will illustrate these mindful strategies of effective thinking through some illustrative puzzles.

Dr. Eli Luberoff

Dr. Eli Luberoff

Eli Luberoff is the CEO of Desmos, a company with a mission "to help every student learn math and love learning math".

Presentation

Knocking Down Barriers with Technology

One-to-one. Accessibility. Personalization. Internationalization. Low floor. High ceiling. What do these all have in common? Each is intended to make mathematics work for every student. Not just the confident students, not just the struggling students, every student. We'll explore the technology and techniques that can open doors, challenge the bored, empower the disempowered, enable the disabled, and turn every student into a mathematics student.

Suzanne Doree

Dr. Suzanne Doree

Dr. Suzanne Doree is the on the Board of Directors for the Mathematical Association of America and teaches mathematics at Augsburg University in Minnesota.

Presentation

The Curious Case of 2s and 3s: Dynamics on Weak Compositions

The "Boltzman Game" begins with N students who each have $1. At each turn, two students are randomly selected and the first student gives $1 to the second, if possible. In the long run, how often does a student have $0, $1, $2, etc.? The answer uses Markov Chains, elementary counting, and other tools from discrete mathematics and uncovers a curious coincidence about $2s and $3s. We will also take a quick look at the state graph on these weak compositions, the induced dynamical system on partitions, and describe the Boltzman Distribution from Statistical Mechanics that motivated the game.

William "Bus" Jaco

Dr. William "Bus" Jaco

William “Bus” Jaco is Regents Professor and Grayce B. Kerr Chair, Department of Mathematics, Oklahoma State University and Executive Director of the Initiative for Mathematics Learning by Inquiry. He holds degrees from Fairmont State University (B.A. magna cum laude), Penn State University (M.A.), and University of Wisconsin-Madison (Ph.D.). He held faculty positions at University of Michigan and Rice University before joining the faculty at Oklahoma State University as Head in 1982. He is a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, an Honorary Life Member of the American Mathematical Society, an Honorary Associate Member of the Moscow Mathematical Society and received Honorary Recognition for Service to St. Petersburg and Russian Mathematics and Mathematicians. He was recognized as the 2017 Eminent Faculty Member at Oklahoma State University and is an outstanding alumnus of Fairmont State University. He served as Head, Department of Mathematics at OSU, 1982-87, as Executive Director and CEO of the American Mathematical Society (Providence, RI), 1988-95, and again became Head of Mathematics at OSU, 2011-2018. He served as Chair-elect, Chair, and Retiring Chair of the Mathematics Section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, serves on the Advisory Board of the American Institute of Mathematics, served on the Board of Mathematical Sciences at the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences, served on the Joint Policy Board for Mathematics, and was an elected member of the Board of Trustees of the American Mathematical Society serving as Chair of the Board of Trustees, 2014-15. His mathematical research is in Geometry and Topology where he studies low-dimensional manifolds, decision problems, algorithms, and complexity theory. Recently he has participated as co-chair of the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Math Task Force, recommending statewide adoption in public higher education of Math Pathways to Completion and Co-Requisite Instruction at Scale. He is PI on a number of funded projects, the largest, The Mathematical Inquiry Project, is a statewide five-year project bringing mathematics learning by inquiry pedagogy in all entry-level college mathematics courses.

 

Short Course

Building a Regional Community to Support Inquiry Learning in Mathematics

The Initiative for Mathematics Learning by Inquiry (MLI) has provided seed funding to establish five (5) Regional Inquiry Learning Communities in Texas. The Short Course will be set up for active engagement; there will be five areas representing each of the five regions so that discussions can take place on the organizational aspects of a Regional Community. We will discuss a protocol that has worked: expanding seed money into more substantial funding, enhancing and scaling the community, the role of mentorship and cultural change, and sustaining the community through viable partnerships and collaborations.

Presentation

The Study of Three-manifolds using Triangulations

We will introduce the notion of using triangulations for a combinatorial (discrete) approach in the study and understanding of three-manifolds. In particular, we introduce a combinatorial deformation theory for an algorithmic construction of the prime decomposition for any given closed three-manifold. We will provide a concurrent and analogous combinatorial deformation theory for surfaces that gives complete visualization of such combinatorial deformations and results in an alternative method for the classification of closed two-manifolds.

Dr. Bryant Wyatt

Dr. Bryant Wyatt

Dr. Bryant Wyatt received his Ph.D. Applied Mathematics from the University of Texas at Arlington and enjoys teaching applied mathematics.

Presentation

Thor onto Democritus:A topological isomorphism on atoms and the void

Today, more than ever, the world needs inspiring mentors and teachers. This is a look into my journey as an educator. Though I may never know exactly where I am on this road, NVIDIA GPUs and undergraduate research has made my time at Tarleton an exciting trip.

Dr. Brandi Stigler

Dr. Brandi Stigler

Presentation

Is Math Really Everywhere?

We have all heard the expression ''math is everywhere''. Sometimes it can be hard to see that. In this talk we will see where mathematics arises in some common applications as well as in some interesting ones. Throughout I will highlight soft skills that are developed when studying mathematics and share how math has shaped certain aspects of my life.