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Headings

Overview

Headings are semantically used to indicate major points (e.g. subjects, topics) on a page. These help users scan the page to jump to important areas, whether they perceive them visually in what appears to be font sizes larger and bolder than paragraphs or audibly with screen readers that list out all the headings on the page out of context. Hierarchy of their importance provide the informational structure of the webpage, much like in a research or thesis paper. These should not be confused with bolding a paragraph, which gives no indication to certain users of their true purpose and is therefore inaccessible.

Heading Type (or Level)

Heading Type will determine what level heading the Heading for Main Content will be. Consider the organization of your entire page, not just this module, when determining which type the heading is.

For example, the first heading on any page must be a Heading 1. This is the title of your page.

Any subsequent heading should be a Heading 1 or Heading 2 (recommended) depending on the organizational relationship to the content in the first Heading 1.

Any subsequent heading after a Heading 2 should typically be a Heading 2 or Heading 3 depending on the organizational relationship to the content in the previous Heading 2.

It is important to note that no Heading Type should be skipped. For example, do not jump from Heading 2 to Heading 4 for aesthetic purposes. Nor should you jump back up to Heading 1 or any other level out of numerical order for aesthetic purposes.

In general, information should be hierarchically organized for scannability and readability.

Tarleton Template Standards

General heading structure should follow Associated Press (AP) Stylebook:

  • The first letter of each word must be capitalized, including proper nouns
  • Words with three letters or less, including articles, stay lowercase unless they are the first word
  • Use proper punctuation throughout the heading text, including colons that separate main titles or topics from subtitles in the same line
  • Headings may only end in exclamation points or question marks, no periods or colons
Good/Bad Examples for Basic Headings
Good Example Bad Example
What can you do? What You Can Do
Best Practices Use the Following Best Practices:
Save the Date for Giving Day! Save the date for Giving Day.

Slideshows have two "heading" sections:

  1. Heading for Slide (main idea): use the AP style described above
  2. Paragraph for Slide (engaging text): capitalize the first letter and leave the rest lowercase, except proper nouns
Good/Bad Examples for Slideshow Headings
Good Example Bad Example
Heading for Slide: Tarleton Memorial Stadium is Receiving a Face-lift
Paragraph for Slide: View the history and future of Tarleton Memorial Stadium
Heading for Slide: Tarleton Memorial Stadium is receiving a face-lift
Paragraph for Slide: View the History and Future of Tarleton Memorial Stadium
Heading for Slide: Fort Worth Groundbreaking
Paragraph for Slide: Watch the Fort Worth groundbreaking
Heading for Slide: Fort Worth groundbreaking
Paragraph for Slide: Watch the Fort Worth groundbreaking.
Heading for Slide: New Student Registration Day: April 7 - July 13
Paragraph for Slide: Learn more about dates and how to sign up
Heading for Slide: New Student Registration Day:
Paragraph for Slide: Learn More About How To Sign Up

Content Modules using this Layout Component

Example(s)

See the example(s) below for potential solutions for content organization. Please note that not all examples are available as many of these content molecules and components can be flexible. Contact Web Services for creative solutions.

Heading 1

Heading 2

Heading 3

Heading 4

Heading 5
Heading 6

Trimheading Heading 1

Trimheading Heading 2

Trimheading Heading 3

Trimheading Heading 4

Trimheading Heading 5
Trimheading Heading 6