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One Grain of Rice

These activities were created by Tony Ponceti, a classroom teacher at Tannihill Intermediate School in White Settlement, TX.  If you have any questions regarding these activities, please contact Tony Ponceti at aap@esc11.net

If you use these activities in your classroom, please send comments to Dr. Kathy Horak Smith at ksmith@tarleton.edu

The Most Popular Food in the World: Rice

Grades 5 and up

Activity 1:  How much are we really talking about?

Objective:  Determine the number of grains of rice on selected days according to the story One Grain of Rice by Demi.

1.  Read One Grain of Rice by Demi, stopping after Rani has been given four grains of rice (You may adjust the stopping point based on the ability of your students.)

2.  Using the book One Grain of Rice, figure out how many grains of rice Rani received on the following days:  Day 14, Day 23, Day 30, and the total of days 1-30.

3.  Complete the accompanying worksheet to record your findings. 

TEKS: (Math 5.5) Patterns, Relationships, and algebraic thinking.  The student makes generalizations based on observed patterns and relationships.  (A) The student is expected to use concrete objects or pictures to make generalizations about determining all possible combinations.

Activity 2:  What do 100, 000 grains of rice mean to me?

Objective: Determine realistic measurements of the amounts of rice from selected points from the book One Grain of Rice by Demi

1.  Using a one-cup measure, determine the number of grains of rice in one cup of dry rice.

2.  Determine the weight of one cup of dry uncooked rice.

3.   Determine the weight and number of cups at 5 different days in the book One Grain of Rice by Demi.

4.  Complete the accompanying worksheet to record your findings.

TEKS:  (Math 5.5) Patterns, Relationships, and algebraic thinking.  The student makes generalizations based on observed patterns and relationships.  (A) The student is expected to use concrete objectives or pictures to make generalizations about determining all possible combinations.

Activity 3:  How many people will all that rice feed:

Objective:  Using a standard recipe for cooking rice, determine the number of servings that is possible from the amount of rice presented to Rani in the book One Grain of Rice by Demi.

1.  Using the measurements from activity 2, determine how many cups of dry uncooked rice are in selected days.

2.  Using the recipe on the back of the package of rice determine how many servings would be able to be made with the rice on the selected days.

3.  Determine how much water and salt would be needed to cook the rice.

4.  Complete the worksheet to record your findings.

TEKS: (5.5) Patterns, Relationships, and algebraic thinking.  The student makes generalizations based on observed patterns and relationships.  (A) The student is expected to use concrete objects or pictures to make generalizations about determining all possible combinations.  (B) The student is expected to use lists, tables, charts, and diagrams to find patterns and make generalizations such as a procedure for determining equivalent fractions.

Activity 4:  Where do people get all of that rice?

Objective:  Using the Internet, find the amount of rice produced by 10 different countries and show these amounts on a graph.  Create another graph based on information discovered from the Internet.

1.  Each team will draw the names of 10 countries.

2.  Using the website http://www.statista.com/topics/1443/rice/  find the rice production rates in 1000 tons for Rough Rice for 10 countries.

3.  Each team will create a chart showing a comparison of the rates of productions for their 10 chosen countries.

4.  Each team will create a pie chart showing world rice production divided by the following areas:  the United States, Latin America, Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa, the rest of the world.  See worksheet 3 for a list of possible countries or add your own.

5.  Each team will create another chart comparing one other factor such as Area and Yield, Population, GNP, Rice Consumption, Etc. 

TEKS: (5.6) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking.  The student describes relationships mathematically.  The student is expected to select from and use diagrams and number sentences to represent real-life situations.

Other Website connections with activities for this book are

http://www.utc.edu/~tpa/mcallister/literature/su99lcwqHarrisC.html

http://www.utc.edu/~tpa/mcallister/literature/f99lcwqMorrowS.html

http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/3695?ref=search