Skip to page content
Return to Top

Take the steps to begin your journey:

Step 1: VisitStep 2: AdmissionsStep 3: ScholarshipsStep 4: HousingStep 5: Financial AidStep 6: First Year

Withdrawing from Classes

Return of Title IV Aid

If you withdraw from all classes, either officially or unofficially, on or before completing 60% of the term and you have received Title IV federal funds in the form of a Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant, Iraq Afghanistan Service Grant, Federal Direct loans, or a Federal PLUS loan, the federal government requires that we review your eligibility for those funds. We are required to apply a federally mandated formula to determine how much of the federal funding was “earned” up to the time of withdrawal. This review and recalculation is called a “Return of Title IV Aid”.

The Title IV funds that were disbursed in excess of the earned amount must be returned to the federal government by the university and/or you.

The amount to be returned to the federal government will be calculated from the date you officially withdrew from classes or, in the case of an unofficial withdrawal (see section above), the last date you were involved in an academically related activity.

Determining Aid Earned

To determine the amount of aid you earned up to the time of withdrawal, Tarleton’s Financial Aid office will determine the percentage of the term that you attended. The resulting percentage is then used, along with your institutional costs and total federal funds that you received (funds that were disbursed directly to your university student account and possibly refunded to you) or that you were eligible to receive, to determine the amount of aid that you are allowed to keep.

Any unearned Title IV aid must be returned to the federal government within 45 days of the date of determination of your withdrawal. The financial aid office will notify you if funds are required to be returned.

Returned Title IV Aid Allocation

Funds that are returned to the federal government are used to reduce the outstanding balances in individual federal programs. Financial aid returned by you and/or your parent or the university must be allocated in the following order:

  1. Federal Unsubsidized Direct Loan
  2. Federal Subsidized Direct Loan
  3. Federal Perkins Loan
  4. Federal Direct Parent Loan (PLUS)
  5. Federal Direct Grad Plus
  6. Federal Pell Grant
  7. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)
  8. Federal Teach Grant
  9. Iraq Afghanistan Service Grant.

The Effect of Dropping Classes

A student receiving financial aid may drop a class or classes during the semester. Dropping a class is not the same as withdrawing totally from ALL courses. The impact on the student’s financial aid is not the same.

Pell Grant Census Date

The Pell Grant census date is the 12th day of the enrollment period. This means that if you are receiving Federal Pell Grant and you drop a class before the census date (12th day of the enrollment period) your Federal Pell Grant may be reduced. Likewise, if you add a class prior to the Pell census date, your Federal Pell Grant may be increased.

If you drop a course after the 12th day of the enrollment period or add a class after the 12th day of the enrollment period, there will be no adjustment to your Pell Grant.

  • Example 1: Oscar P. started the semester as a full-time (minimum 12 semester hours) undergraduate student. His Federal Pell Grant disbursed based upon this full time enrollment. On the 10th day of the enrollment period, Oscar P. drops a 3 credit hour class. His financial aid is then adjusted to reflect the new Federal Pell Grant amount for the 9 credits instead of the 12 credits. A reduction is made and the amount of the reduced Pell Grant is then charged back to the Oscar P’s student account.
  • Example 2: Oscar P. started the semester as a half-time (minimum 6 semester hours) undergraduate student. His Federal Pell Grant disbursed based upon this half-time enrollment. On the 15th day of the enrollment period, Oscar P. added 6 credit hours, making him full-time. Since this is after the Pell census date, there is no adjustment to Oscar P’s Federal Pell Grant. He will not receive any additional Pell Grant.
  • Example 3: Oscar P. started the semester as a full-time (minimum 12 semester hours) undergraduate student. On the 16th day of the enrollment period, he dropped 6 credit hours and was only in 10 credit hours. Because it was after the Pell census date, there is no adjustment to Oscar P’s Federal Pell Grant.

Dropping a class(es) or withdrawing from courses

Students are required to make satisfactory academic progress (SAP) to be eligible for financial aid. One aspect of SAP is monitoring your “Completion Rate”. This is how many courses you complete in each semester. If you begin with 12 credits and only finish with 6 credits, your completion rate is 50%. You must complete at a minimum 67% of the courses in which you begin each semester in order to remain in good Satisfactory Academic Progress standing for financial aid purposes. So, if you withdraw or drop classes, this could not only impact the amount of financial aid you received for that semester, but it may impact your ability to receive financial aid in the future semesters.

If you are considering withdrawing or dropping classes and are not sure how this will impact your current or future financial aid, you should come to the Financial Aid Office to talk with an Advisor.