PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)

1013.† Introduction to Philosophy. (3-0) A survey of the principal systems of philosophical inquiry, epistemology, logic, ethics, and aesthetics.

2013.† Introduction to Logic. (3-0) This course will introduce the student to the basic principles and concepts of formal logic, formal and informal fallacies, deductive and inductive reasoning, truth tables, symbolic notation, Venn diagrams, and the logic of scientific method. It will also include consideration of the philosophical foundations of logic.

3013.† Ethics in the Professions. (3-0) This course will consider both the responsibilities inherent in a profession as such and some of the specific ethical dilemmas that arise in particular professions: business, science, engineering, military, education, medicine, etc. Prerequisite: Junior classification.

4033.† Political Theory Through 1789. (3-0) Philosophical ideas concerning basic political problems from the Greeks to 1789. Credit for both PHIL 4033 and POLS 4033 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023.

4043.† Political Theory Since 1789. (3-0) Philosophical ideas concerning basic political problems since 1789. Credit for both PHIL 4043 and POLS 4043 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023.

4853.† Philosophy Seminar. (3-0) An examination of major philosophical issues and theories. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisite: Junior classification or approval of department head.

4863.† Problems in Philosophy (Credit variable) Independent reading, research, and discussion. Entry into this course will be arranged with the instructor and department head.

5853.† Philosophy Seminar. (3-0) Content varies according to the needs and desires of students. When topic varies, course may be taken for credit more than once.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (P ED)

2003.† Foundations of Exercise and Sport Studies. (3-0) An introductory course in Exercise and Sport Studies. Included will be history of physical education and sport; health-related fitness concepts; nutrition for sport and athletics; stress management techniques; and objectives and principles of exercise and sport.

2123.† Introduction to Athletic Training. (2-2) An introductory course required for entrance into the Athletic Training licensure program. It includes the study and application of the requirements and competencies necessary for licensure and the skills involved in the care of the athlete and physically active.

2183.† Theory of Gymnastics and Dance. (2-2) Theory and practice of skills in basic gymnastics and tumbling; dance activities including square dance, folk, and country-western dance. Prerequisite: P ED 1192. Lab fee $5.

2192.† Coaching Football. (1-3) Concentration on skills and techniques in coaching football.

2202.† Coaching Basketball. (1-3) Concentration on skills and techniques in coaching basketball.

2232.† Coaching Track and Field. (1-3) Concentration on skills and techniques in coaching track.

2242.† Coaching Baseball. (1-3) Concentration on skills and techniques of coaching baseball.

2262.† Coaching Volleyball. (2-2) Concentration on skills and techniques of coaching volleyball.

2272.† Sports Officiating. (2-2) A course designed to teach the rules and mechanics of sports officiating in football, basketball, volleyball, and baseball/softball. Students will be required to assist in a variety of officiating activities outside the formal classroom.

2282.† Coaching Softball. (2-2) Concentration on skills and techniques of coaching softball.

2303.† Motor Behavior. (2-2) A study of the behavioral characteristics for skill acquisition due to motor, physical, and neuromuscular development. Application of instructional techniques with children in a school setting is a part of this course. Prerequisite: P ED 2003 or approval of department head. Lab fee $5.

2503.† Games and Activities for Children. (3-0) A course designed to acquaint the student with the underlying theory and principles of play activities for children and to introduce the student to a variety of games and activities for children.

3103.† Tests and Measurements. (2-2) Use and function of tests in Exercise and Sport Studies. Test construction and interpretation will be studied. Statistical techniques will be reviewed. Prerequisite: 12 hours of Physical Education course work and junior classification. Lab fee $5.

3123.† Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries. (2-2) The study and application of skills in the prevention and care of injuries affecting the athlete and physically active. Prerequisites: HLTH 2313, BIOL 2194. Lab fee $15.

3133.† Assessment of Athletic Injuries and Illnesses. (2-2)The study and application of principles and techniques for assessment of athletic injuries and illnesses including signs and symptoms, classification of injuries and illnesses, emergency assessment, and clinical assessment. Prerequisites: P ED 2123, 3123, BIOL 2194, 2204.

3143.† Therapeutic Exercise. (2-2) The study and application of therapeutic exercise techniques in the rehabilitation of athletic injuries including restoration of range of motion, muscular strength and endurance, cardiorespiratory endurance, neuromuscular control, and balance. Prerequisites: P ED 2123, 3123, BIOL 2194, 2204.

3203.† Theory of Strength Training and Conditioning. (3-0) The study and survey of contemporary strength training and conditioning. Successful completion of the course allows the student to sit for the appropriate examinations relative to being certified as a Strength and Conditioning Specialist. Prerequisites: BIOL 2194 or 2204, HLTH 2313. Lab fee $5.

3263.† Outdoor Adventure. (2-2) Outdoor resources and adventure activities are utilized as opportunities for experiential learning. Activities can include the Tarleton Challenge Course, hiking, backpacking, camping, mountaineering, rock climbing, biking, canoeing, kayaking, orienteering, safety and first aid. Lab fee $25.

3403.† Integrated Movement Activities. (3-0) A study of movement experiences designed to integrate concepts of exercise and sport studies with language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, art, and music. Prerequisite: P ED 2503 or approval of department head.

3803.† Adaptive, Corrective, and Developmental Exercise. (2-2) A study of the behavioral characteristics, causes, needs, and corrective strategies for individuals with disabling conditions. Practical application with special needs individuals is a course requirement. Prerequisite: P ED 2303. Lab fee $5.

4053.† Practicum in Exercise and Sport Studies. (1-4) Practicum in the exercise and sport studies activity program involving a demonstrated proficiency in a variety of activities related to exercise and sport. Prerequisites: Senior classification and approval of department head. Lab fee $5.

4123.† Therapeutic Modalities. (2-2) The study and application of therapeutic modalities in the care of athletic injuries including psychological aspects, healing process, pain control, superficial cold and hear, electrotherapy, ultrasound, mechanical energy, and biofeedback. Prerequisites: P ED 2123, 3123, BIOL 2194, 2204.

4133.† Management in Athletic Training. (3-0) A study of the principles and application of knowledge and skills necessary to manage an athletic training program including areas of finance, information, insurance, human resources, facilities, ethics, and legal considerations. Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Athletic Training Education Program.

4143.† Clinical Experience in Athletic Training. (1-9) Clinical experience in athletic training under appropriate supervision of qualified professionals in collegiate, high school, and clinical settings. Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Athletic Training Education Program. Lab fee $5.

4163.† Individual and Team Sport Skills. (2-2) A course designed to acquaint the student with a variety of individual and team sport activities. Included will be history, strategies, and physical skills related to those activities along with foundations of exercise. Designed as a capstone course prior to student teaching. Prerequisites: 18 hours of P ED course work or approval of department head. Lab fee $5.

4203.† Physiology of Exercise. (2-2) Effects of physical exercise on body processes. Prerequisites: BIOL 2194, 2204. Lab fee $5.

4303.† Physiotherapy. (2-2) Physiology of exercise in the treatment of the degenerative effects of sedentary lifestyles associated with chronic disease and/or disabilities. Prerequisite: P ED 4203 or approval of department head. Lab fee $5.

4403.† Exercise Electrocardiography. (2-2) A study of the rate, rhythm, and axis of the heart obtained during graded exercise testing. Prerequisites: BIOL 2194 or 2204, HLTH 2313, P ED 4203, 4303 or approval of department head. Lab fee $5.

4703.† The Organization and Administration of Exercise and Sports Programs. (3-0) Principles, practices, and procedures in the organization and administration of exercise and sports programs. Prerequisites: 12 hours of Physical Education and senior classification.

4803.† Kinesiology. (3-0) Investigation and analysis of human motion in relationship to structure and function according to general mechanical laws and other factors. Prerequisites: BIOL 2194, 2204.

4826.† Internship in Exercise and Sport Studies. (1-19) Supervised internship with selected agencies and organizations such as intramural sports, city recreation departments, YMCAs and YWCAs, Boys' Clubs, Girl and Boy Scouts, rehabilitation centers, and similar agencies and organizations. Prerequisites: Senior classification and approval of department head. Field experience fee $50.

4853.† Seminar. (Credit variable) This course will focus on current topics and issues of interest in exercise and sport studies. It may be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: Junior level standing or approval of department head.

4863.† Problems. (Credit variable) Directed study of selected problems in Physical Education. May be repeated for credit with approval of department head. Restricted to Physical Education majors and minors.

5003.† Physical Education for the Elementary School Child. (3-0) A study of the unique physical needs of the elementary school age child and current trends in meeting those needs. Emphasis upon the identification of appropriate activities for each grade level, the role of the classroom and special teachers in physical education, and state and national standards and requirements. Prerequisite: Approval of department head.

5013.† Readings in Health and Physical Education. (3-0) A study of published reports and research in the field of health and physical education.

5053.† Administration of Athletic Programs. (3-0) A study of the administrative functions of directors of athletic programs. Liability laws, financial administration, personnel, public relations, and state laws governing athletic programs will be explored.

5063.† School and Community Health Programs. (3-0) For teachers, coaches, and school administrators who desire an understanding of a well balanced program.

5123.† Contemporary Issues in Sports Medicine. (3-0) A study of the contemporary issues in Sports Medicine. Content areas may include eating disorders, injury prevention, emergency care, drug education and testing, pre-participation physical exams, history, terminology, specific injury care, and legal and ethical issues.

5263.† Facilities of Physical Education. (3-0) Principles, terminology, and standards for planning, constructing, and maintaining physical education facilities.

5283.† Adaptive Physical Education. (3-0) A study of muscle re-education and the application of exercise to orthopedic, muscular, and neurological disorders. Principles of planning and directing therapeutic and adaptive programs in physical education activity.

5363.† Advanced Tests and Measurements in Health and Physical Education. (3-0) Methods of construction, validation, and statistical interpretation of tests and measurements in physical education.

5403.† Motor Learning and Control. (3-0) A survey of the theories and practical applications of human motor performance and achievement.

5703.† History of Physical Education. (3-0) A survey of physical education and sports from the origins in Ancient Greece to the present. The emphasis being social and cultural developments that contributed to the growth of physical education and sports in the modern world.

5853.† Seminar. (3-0) Discussion of laws, certification, professional ethics, and other current programs relating to health and physical education.

5863.† Problems. (Credit variable) Directed study of elected problems in health and physical education. Prerequisite: P ED 5013.

5883.† Thesis. (3-0) Scheduled when the student is ready to begin the thesis. No credit until the thesis is completed. Prerequisites: P ED 5013, EDU 5573, and consent of major professor.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES (P SC)

1014.† Physical Sciences Survey. (3-3) A one-semester survey course of the physical sciences. Topics are selected from astronomy, meteorology, chemistry, geology and physics to illustrate the philosophic methods of science. This course does not count toward the university lab science requirement. Lab fee $5.

PHYSICS (PHYS)

1014.† Great Ideas of Physics. (3-3) Great Ideas of Physics is a laboratory science course designed to introduce the student to the concepts of physics in an elementary mathematical setting, and to discuss their significance to science, technology, and society. Topics will be drawn from both classical and contemporary physics. Prerequisite: Two semesters of high school algebra or MATH 1013. This course cannot be used for credit toward a degree in physics or mathematics. Lab fee $8. Course fee $5.

1034.† Planetary Astronomy. (3-3) A laboratory science course of study in topics of astronomy and astrophysics, including the history of astronomy, Keplerís laws, gravitation, formation of the solar system, asteroids, comets, meteors, a detailed survey of the planets and their evolution, and discussion on the possibility of life in the universe. Prerequisites: Two semesters of high school algebra or MATH 1013. Lab fee $8.

1134.† Stellar Astronomy. (3-3) A laboratory science course of study in topics of astronomy and astrophysics, including the sun and its source of energy, stellar formation and evolution, black holes, galaxies, cosmology, and the creation and evolution of the universe. Prerequisites: two semesters of high school algebra or MATH 1013. Lab fee $8.

1044.† General Physics I. (3-3) Mechanics, heat, and sound. Prerequisite: Two units of high school algebra and either one unit of high school trigonometry or credit or concurrent registration in MATH 1093. A student cannot get credit for PHYS 1044 if credit has been previously received for PHYS 1224. Lab fee $8. Course fee $5.

1054.† General Physics II. (3-3) Electricity and magnetism, light, and modern physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1044. A student cannot get credit for PHYS 1054 if credit has previously been received for PHYS 2424. Lab fee $8. Course fee $5.

1224.† Principles of Physics I. (3-3) This is an introduction to mechanics, heat, and wave motion. A calculus-based course for Physical Science, Engineering, and Mathematics majors. Prerequisite: MATH 1204 or concurrent registration. Lab fee $8. Course fee $5.

2424.† Principles of Physics II. (3-3) This is an introduction to electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Prerequisites: PHYS 1224 and MATH 2094 or concurrent registration. Lab fee $8.

3313.† Mechanics I. (3-0) Particle dynamics in one, two, and three dimensions; conservation laws; dynamics of a system of particles; motion of rigid bodies; central force problems. Prerequisites: PHYS 2424, MATH 2104, 3063, or concurrent registration.

3323.† Electromagnetic Field Theory. (3-0) Electrostatics; Laplace's equation; the theory of dielectrics; magnetostatic fields; electromagnetic induction; magnetic fields of currents; Maxwell's equations. Prerequisites: PHYS 2424, MATH 3063, or concurrent registration.

3333.† Thermodynamics. (3-0) Concept of temperature, equations of state; the first and the second law of thermodynamics; entropy; change of phase; the thermodynamics functions. May enroll in ENGR or PHYS; however, credit for both ENGR 3273 and PHYS 3333 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: PHYS 2424, MATH 2104 or approval of department head.

3343.† Modern Physics I. (3-0) Foundations of the atomic theory of matter; kinetic theory; elementary particles; radiations; atomic model; atomic structure; atomic spectra and energy levels; quantum theory of radiation; x-rays; special theory of relativity. Prerequisites: PHYS 2424, MATH 2104.

4303.† Mathematical Methods of Physics. (3-0) Mathematical techniques from the following areas: infinite series; integral transforming; applications of complex variables; vectors, matrices, and tensors; special functions; partial differential equations; Green's functions; perturbation theory; integral equations; calculus of variations; and groups and group representatives. Prerequisite: MATH 3063.

4323.† Optics. (3-0) Huygen's principle applied to geometric optics; interference; diffraction; polarization; crystal optics; electromagnetic theory of light; interaction of light with matter. Prerequisites: PHYS 2424 and MATH 3063.

4343.† Modern Physics II. (3-0) The constitution of the atomic nucleus; natural radioactivity; artificially induced nuclear transmutations; alpha, beta, and gamma decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear structure and nuclear forces; nuclear fission; neutron physics. Prerequisites: PHYS 3343 and MATH 3063 or concurrent registration.

4353.† Quantum Physics. (3-0) The Schroedinger equation; one dimensional systems; the Heisenberg uncertainty principle; magnetic moments and angular momentum; two and three dimensional systems; approximation methods; scattering theory. Prerequisite: PHYS 3343.

4363.† Solid State Physics. (3-0) The basic ideas of physics are applied to the understanding of the properties of crystalline materials to include the definition of such materials, electrical and thermal conductivity, heat capacity, crystalline binding, the nature of metals, insulators, and semiconductors, dielectric properties, and magnetic properties. Prerequisites: PHYS 3343.

4373.† Nuclear Physics and Techniques (3-0) The study of nuclear phenomena and properties including mass, stability, magnetic moment, radioactive decay processes and angular momentum. The use of nuclear techniques to analyze problems in other fields of engineering with a special emphasis on the characterization of electronic materials. Prerequisite: PHYS 3343.

4863.† Special Problems. (Credit variable) This course is designed to develop the theoretical or experimental capabilities, or both, of individual senior physics majors. Prerequisites: Senior classification and approval of department head.

5033.† Astronomy. (3-0) Selected topics in astronomy appropriate for public school teachers. Course may be repeated when topic changes.

POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLS)

2013.† American National Government. (3-0) A study of the American national governmental system. This course with POLS 2023 satisfies the legal requirement for graduation from state colleges and universities. Prerequisite: 24 semester hours completed.

2023.† Texas Government. (3-0) A study of the constitution of the state of Texas and of the state and local governmental units created by the constitution. This course satisfies the TEA requirement for out-of-state teacher certification and, when taken with POLS 2013, the legal requirement for graduation from state colleges and universities. Prerequisite: 24 semester hours completed.

3023.† Elections and Political Parties. (3-0) The study of the electoral process in American national, state, and local political systems. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of the structure and functions of political parties, interest groups, the news media, and other participants in the electoral process. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023.

3033.† Comparative State and Local Government and Politics. (3-0) Variations and similarities in the practice of politics and in the administration of government in the states. Particular attention is given to local government and state-national relations. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023.

3043.† The Executive. (3-0) The study of the organization of executive power in American national, state, and local systems. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of the structure and functions of the Presidency of the United States and national, state, and local bureaucracies, and the role of parties, legislatures, courts, interest groups, and other participants in the executive process. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023.

3053.† Legislation. (3-0) The study of the legislative process in American national, state, and local political systems. Emphasis will placed on the evolution of the structure and functions of the Congress and the state legislatures, and the role of executives, courts, parties, interest groups, and other participants in the legislative process. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023.

3063.† Political Economy. (3-0) A study of the historical, philosophical, and theoretical relationships between the state and the economy. Credit for both POLS 3063 and ECO 3063 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: 3 hours of ECO and 6 hours of POLS or instructorís approval.

3073.† Public Administration. (3-0) A survey of the concepts and practices of American public administration. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023.

3083.† International Politics. (3-0) The development of the national state system, the problems and issues which have arisen, international agencies created to cope with these problems, and the principles of international conduct. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023.

3103.† Environmental Politics. (3-0) An introduction to the study of the politics of environmental protection. Special emphasis will be given to the conflict in America between advocates of preservation, conservation and the exploitation of nature for human purposes. The course is designed to serve as a prelude to thinking about appropriate policies for governments to implement. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023.

4013.† Constitutional Law I. (3-0) The origin and growth of the constitutional aspects of national power as shown by leading U.S. Supreme Court decisions on commerce, federalism, jurisdiction, money, monopolies, treaties, and war. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023, HIST 2013, 2023.

4023.† Constitutional Law II. (3-0) The origin and development of constitutional prohibitions as shown by leading U.S. Supreme Court decisions on civil rights, contracts, due process, economic regulation, eminent domain, labor relations, obscenity, political utterance, and religion. Prerequisite: POLS 4013.

4033.† Political Theory Through 1789. (3-0) Philosophical ideas concerning basic political problems from the Greeks to 1789. Credit for both PHIL 4033 and POLS 4033 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023.

4043.† Political Theory Since 1789. (3-0) Philosophical ideas concerning basic political problems since 1789. Credit for both PHIL 4043 and POLS 4043 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023.

4053.† Comparative Government and Politics. (3-0) The government and politics of the major world powers. Examples may be drawn from Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023.

4103.† Environmental Policy. (3-0) The study of the governmental policies enacted in response to the degradation of the natural environment. Attention will be paid both to individual and institutional behavior with particular reference to the abatement and control of air and water pollution. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023.

4153.† Foreign Policy. (3-0) The study of Americaís role in the modern world. Particular emphasis is placed on the policy makers, for example, the President, Congress, the State Department, and the Department of Defense, and on external factors such as other nations. Prerequisites: POLS 2013, 2023.

4803.† Administration of Justice. (3-0) Analyzes the structure, function, and interrelationship of the components of the criminal justice system at the federal, state, and local levels. The history and philosophy of criminal justice in a democratic society will be included. Credit for both POLS 4803 and C J 4803 will not be awarded.

4843.† Internship. (Credit variable) Application and integration of academic study and development of skills in a field setting. Field projects include direction of a political campaign, internship in a city or county administrative office, or in a not-for-profit organization for analyzing or carrying out governmental policy. Minimum of 200 hours of work required for 3 hours of credit. Prerequisites: 2.5 overall grade point average, advanced standing, and approval of department head. Field experience fee $50.

4853.† Political Science Seminar. (Credit variable; 1-0 for each hour) Independent reading, research, discussion, and paper writing, under personal direction of instructor. Prerequisites: Senior classification, 18 hours POLS, or approval of department head. May be taken more than once for credit.

4863.† Political Science Problems. (Credit variable) Independent reading, research and discussion. Entry into this course will be arranged with the political science counselor.

5303.† Public Management. (3-0) The practical application of theories of public administration, the study of problems of administrative management in public organizations, and the use of law for administrative decision-making.

5603.† Political Culture. (3-0) The study of political culture as it forms and is formed by public policy. Examples may include the culture of environmental policy, bureaucratic policy, foreign policy, and others.

5613.† Politics of Education. (3-0) The study of the relationship between politics and education in America including K-12 and post-secondary systems.

5623.† Environmental Policy. (3-0) The study of the politics of the natural environment with emphasis on the role of government in environmental protection.

5853.† Political Science Seminar. (3-0) Contents vary according to the needs and desires of students. Independent reading, research, discussion, and writing under personal direction of instructor. May be repeated once for credit when topic varies.

5863.† Political Science Problems. (Credit variable) Conference course. Independent reading, research, discussion, under supervision of senior professor.

5883.† Thesis. (3-0) Scheduled when student is ready to begin thesis. No credit until thesis is accepted. Prerequisites: 24 hours of graduate credit and approval of department head.

5993.† Practicum, Field Problem, or Internship. (3-0) Supervised professional activities in school administration, counseling, supervision, college or public school teaching, or other public service professions. Major emphasis is placed on the student's involvement in successful practices in the area of professional interest. May be repeated once for credit. Field experience fee $50.

PSYCHOLOGY (PSY)

1013.† General Psychology. (3-0) An overview of psychology, the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes and the variables that influence these processes. Topics covered in the course include motivation, emotions, intelligence, sensory processes, perception, learning, thinking, mental health, and psychotherapy.

1023.† Psychology of Adjustment. (3-0) A study of human behavioral and mental processes that permit us to adjust or to meet the demands of a changing physical or psychological environment with an emphasis upon effective personal-social adjustment. Topics covered include social influence, stress, psychological factors and physical health, health-enhancing behaviors, addictive behaviors, methods of coping, gender roles and differences, and interpersonal attraction. Prerequisite: PSY 1013.

2013.† Psychology of Human Development. (3-0) A lifespan study of the development of human beings from conception to death. The growth and developmental patterns of the eight age groups are studied† with attention directed to experimental evidence, case studies, and contemporary theories. Prerequisite: PSY 1013. PSY 2013 may not be counted as part of the professional education component for teacher certification.

2203.† Child and Adolescent Psychology. (3-0). A study of children from infancy through adolescence with emphasis on the analysis of behavior based on experimental evidence and contemporary theory. Prerequisite: PSY 1013.

3013.† Psychology of Learning. (3-0). An investigation into the major theoretical approaches, concepts and principles, and experimental methods of learning. Prerequisites: PSY 1013 and junior standing, or approval of the department head.

3033.† Educational Psychology. (3-0) An application of psychological theories and principles to teaching and learning. Topics will include theories of human development, learning, and motivation, and how these impact the processes of teaching and learning. The course will also include the impact of cultural diversity on the learning process and standardized testing. Credit for both EDU 3033 and PSY 3033 will not be awarded. Students seeking teacher certification must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program. Prerequisite: PSY 1013 and junior classification or approval of department head.

3053.† Human Cognitive Processes. (3-0) A survey of human cognition and information processing, including perception, attention, memory, reasoning, and problem solving. Also included are the experimental methods and current theories of human cognition. Prerequisites: PSY 1013 and junior standing or approval of department head.

3073. The Human Lifespan. (3-0) Surveys development from conception through adulthood with emphasis on social adaptation of individuals and roles in families, groups, and communities. Cognitive, social, personal and biological factors of the stages of development are included.

3103.† Abnormal Psychology. (3-0) An overview of the history, causes, and treatments of deviant behavior. Psychological, social, and physiological factors as they relate to the development of abnormal behavior and its subsequent treatment. Prerequisites: Junior classification and PSY 1013, 1023, or approval of department head.

3113.† Behavior Analysis and Behavior Management. (3-0). Examines the basic principles and methods of behavior analysis and behavior management techniques. Includes a systematic review of behavioral and cognitive-behavioral methodologies for dealing with human problems such as disruptive behavior, personal adjustment difficulties, behavioral deficits, phobias and fears, developmental disorders, stress and maladaptive behavior in a variety of settings.

3203.† Psycholinguistics. (3-0) The course emphasizes the study of language, understanding languages, producing language and speech, language development, and related topics such as reading, language and the brain, linguistic diversity, and universals. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

3303.† Elementary Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences. (3-0) Measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Applications of statistical inference to research in Psychology. Reliability and validity of psychological tests and measurement. Also included are analysis of variance, multiple analysis of variance, and regression. Prerequisites: PSY 1013 and MATH 1073 or equivalent.

3323.† Psychopharmacology. (3-0) A study of the neuroscientific basis of the effects of drugs on behavior. Emphasis will be placed on major antipsychotic, antianxiety, and antidepressant drugs and their clinical use and side effects. Drug abuse such as alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine will also be reviewed. Prerequisite: PSY 1013 or approval of department head.

3354.† Principles of Research for the Behavioral Sciences. (3-2). A study of the various research designs used in the behavioral sciences. Laboratory experiences will be required to acquaint the student with experimental procedures. Instruction will also be provided in writing research reports according to the APA manuscript style and SPSS statistical applications. Prerequisites: ENGL 2303 and PSY 3303 or equivalent. Lab fee $20.

3503.† Personality. (3-0) An introduction to personality, the unique and relatively stable patterns of behavior, thoughts, and feelings that make individual human beings. The different theoretical approaches - psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, humanistic, and existential - will be covered and will be related to personality and personality development. Prerequisites: PSY 1013, 1023, or approval of department head.

3603.† Sport Psychology. (3-0) This course will provide students with an overview of the theories and research related to sport and exercise behavior. Topics to be covered include the history of sport psychology, behavioral principles, anxiety, motivation, leadership, group dynamics, gender, and personality. The course will also be designed to relate these principles to exercise and sport performance. Prerequisite: PSY 1013 or approval of department head.

4013.† Psychological Tests and Measurement. (3-0). Principles of psychological testing. Uses and critical evaluation of tests of achievement, intelligence, aptitude, and personality.

4053.† Social Psychology. (3-0) Theory and phenomena of social psychology. The effect of social variables upon the behavior of individuals. Topics to be covered include socialization, language and communication, prejudice, social attitudes, attitude change, aggression, prosocial behavior, and group behavior. Prerequisites: PSY 1013, 1023 or approval of department head.

4103.† Industrial/Organizational Psychology. (3-0). A survey of the basic theories and practices of Industrial/Organizational psychology including selection testing, job analysis, performance appraisal training, employment motivation, job satisfaction, leadership and group processes within organizations. Prerequisites: PSY 1013, 1023, or approval of department head.

4123.† Biological Foundations of Behavior. (3-0) Surveys the biological basis of behavior. Includes an in-depth examination of the physical structure of the human body and the role of chemical and electrical operations within it. Emphasis will be placed on the developmental, cognitive, affective and behavioral effects of such operations. Recent research will also be reviewed.

4203.† History of Psychology. (3-0). Historical analysis of prescientific psychology in philosophy and physiology through the period of the psychological schools of thought. Prerequisites: PSY 1013, 1023, or approval of department head.

4863.† Problems in Psychology. (Credit variable) Independent reading and research on various topics related to Psychology. Entry into the course will be arranged by the director of the Psychology program.

4903.† Special Topics. Independent reading and research on various topics related to Psychology. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

5003.† Behavioral Statistics. (3-0) Review of descriptive statistics with emphasis on inferential statistics. Includes correlation, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, regression analysis and experimental design. Use of computer software with emphasis on experience with SPSS. Prerequisite: Undergraduate Statistics recommended. Lab fee assessed.

5013.† Research Methods. (3-0) A study of the scientific method of research, types of research and research design. Students are required to review, analyze and interpret research findings in their major field and develop a research project with the assistance of their instructor. This course should be taken after the completion of 12 graduate semester hours. Prerequisites: Appropriate graduate level course in statistics. Lab fee assessed.

5023.† Social Psychological Processes. (3-0) An in-depth examination of the individual in a social and cultural context. Topics include: the behavior of groups, the roles of individuals within groups, and the influence of groups on an individualís perceptions, attitudes, emotions, and behavior. Major theories and supporting research are covered. Includes a selected emphasis on specific topics, with individual or team projects and/or original research. Prerequisite: PSY 5063 or approval of department head.

5033.† Theories of Learning. (3-0) Study of major theories of learning, factors which influence the process of learning, and application of these theories and processes to general and special populations. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate School or approval of department head.

5043.† Human Development. (3-0) A lifespan survey of the development of human beings from conception to death. Topics included will be research and theory into physical, cognitive, social, and personality development in each of the different age groups: prenatal, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.

5053.† Practicum I: Field Experience. (3-0) Provides supervised experience in settings such as marriage and family, mental health, and/or counseling and guidance placements outside the University. The field experience will consist of 150 clock hours with 100 client contact hours. Prerequisites: PSY 5063, 5073, and 5813, CNSL 5573, CPSY 5543 and 5583, 3.0 GPA, and consent of the practicum/internship director. Field experience fee $50.

5063.† Foundations, Ethics and Professional Issues. (3-0) Examines theories and concepts of psychology with emphasis on therapeutic skills in counseling, as well as ethical and professional issues. Selected problems are reviewed in relation to conceptual, ethical and professional issues.

5073.† Personality Theories and Applications. (3-0) Surveys and investigates personality and counseling theories with an emphasis on how theories influence practice. Students will be exposed to the different theories through readings, case studies, and role plays. Prerequisite: PSY 5063 or approval of department head.

5113.† Cultural, Minority and Gender Issues. (3-0) Study of interaction of social/cultural groups in America, problems of minorities and ethnic groups, problems related to gender and age, problems within family systems and contemporary sources of positive change.

5143.† Assessment of Intelligence and Achievement. (3-0) Introduces the selection, administration and interpretation of selected tests used in the individual measurement of intelligence, including the Wechsler, SOMPA, KABC and Stanford Binet. Screening instruments such as the Bender Gestalt and various achievement tests such as the WIAT and WRAT are also presented. Prerequisite: PSY 5003 and 5813 and CPSY 5583. Lab Fee $50. Course fee $50.

5153.† Physiological Psychology. (3-0) An examination of the biological basis of behavior with an emphasis on the structure and biochemistry of the human nervous system. Includes an exploration of the interactive relationships between biological processes, psychopharmacology, genetics, neurological disorders, normal growth and maturation, perception, memory, emotion, stress, mental disorders, consciousness, and communication. Contemporary theories and research are investigated and critiqued. Prerequisites: PSY 5063 or approval of department head.

5803.† Personality and Social Assessment. (3-0) Instruction and supervision in the assessment of emotional, motivational, interpersonal, and attitudinal characteristics of children and adults. Includes the administration, scoring, and interpretation of many widely-used tests such as the MMPI, 16PF, Millon scales, and others. Prerequisites: PSY 5813 and CPSY 5583. Lab fee $50.

5813.† Assessment and Evaluation Fundamentals. (3-0). Examines the nature and development of standardized tests, with emphasis on ethical standards, psychometric theory, test standards and test construction. Selection criteria and utilization of standardized and other instruments in various environments are considered. Includes evaluations and critiques of published tests and experiential exposure to different types of psychological tests. Prerequisite: PSY 5003. Lab fee assessed.

5823.† Behavior Management and Therapy. (3-0). Examines basic theories of human learning, major approaches to behavior management and therapy and principles of applied behavior analysis. Formal treatment planning application and evaluation of programs for management of specific behavioral/psychological problems. Includes case review and practice in individual interventions

5833.† Consultation and Supervision. (3-0) Introduces the application of psychological principles of consultation and supervision in selected settings. Emphasis is on analysis of client and consultee/supervisor behaviors, individual and group communications, program evaluation and possible intervention options in selected environments.

5843.† Practicum II: Field Experience. (3-0) Continues Practicum I. The field experience will consist of 150 clock hours with 100 client contact hours. Prerequisite: PSY 5053, 3.0 GPA, and consent of the practicum/internship director. Field experience fee $50.

5863.† Problems. (Credit variable) Directed independent study or research under the supervision of a member of the psychology faculty. Prerequisites: graduate standing and approval of department head.

5873.† Practicum III: Field Experience. (3-0) Continues Practicum II. The field experience will consist of 200 clock hours with 100 client contact hours. Prerequisites: PSY 5843, 3.0 GPA, and consent of practicum/internship director. Field experience fee $50.

5883.† Thesis. (3-0). Scheduled when the student is ready to begin the thesis. No credit until the thesis is completed. Prerequisites: Completion of all course work required by the degree and consent of the major professor.

5903.† Special Topics. (Variable Credit 1-3) An examination of different topics each semester with a focus on contemporary issues in counseling. This course may be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

5953.† Internship I. (3-0) Supervised professional activities in psychology. Major emphasis is placed on the studentís involvement in successful practices in the area of interest. Students must have met all academic and professional standards of practice before placement. Lab experiences are included. Prerequisites: Completion of all course work required by the degree and application for internship. Field experience fee $50.

5963.† Internship II. (3-0) Continued supervised experience of professional activities in psychology in the studentís area of interest. Major emphasis is placed on the integration of theoretical and conceptual principles, as well as professional and personal skill development. Prerequisites: PSY 5953 and application for internship. Field experience fee $50.

RANGE AND RANCH MANAGEMENT (R&RM)

2213.† Wildlife Habitat and Range Management. (3-0) An introduction to wildlife and range resources of the United States with special reference to Texas. The importance of animals, forests, and rangelands in our economic and cultural life; the symbiotic phenomena between wildlife and range/forest management. Credit for both R&RM 2213 and WLDM 2213 will not be awarded. Course fee $5.

3003.† Rangeland and Forest Plants. (2-2) Comprehensive study of native and naturalized North American plants used for range, habitat, and wood products. Major domesticated pasture plants. Detailed treatment of systematics, nomenclature, morphological features, and ecology with emphasis on economically important range, lumber-pulp, and watershed species. Prerequisites: AGRN 1053 and BIOL 1204. Lab fee $2.

3013.† Principles of Range Management. (2-2) Principles and practices for managing native grazing lands. Use of the Cardinal Principles for conservation of range resources. Sustained forage, animal, water, etc., production and ranching profitability. Application of ecology and plant physiology to grazing management. Land-vegetation manipulations to restore deteriorated ranges and watersheds. Prerequisites: AGRN 1053 and BIOL 1204. Lab fee $2.

3023.† Range Plants (2-2) Nomenclature and classification of range plants in the U.S. with emphasis on distribution, ecology, and economic value of species important in Texas. Prerequisite: Completion of all required freshman agriculture courses. Lab fee $5.

3103.† Wildlife Management Techniques. (2-2) Field and laboratory techniques used in wildlife management and research. Determining age, food habits, population analysis, habitat analysis, and introduction to research. Credit for both R&RM 3103 and WLDM 3103 will not be awarded. Modest cost of field trips will be borne by student Prerequisite: R&RM 2213 or W S 2213. Course fee $5.

3153.† Range Ecology. (2-2) Introduction of the physical and biological components of rangeland ecosystems and their influence on plant and animal growth. Field study of range ecosystems in the Cross Timbers area with emphasis on dynamics, interactions, and manipulation. Prerequisites: AGRN 1053, ANSC 1073, and R&RM 3023. Lab fee $7.

3203.† Watershed Management. (3-0) Management and planning of range and forest land watersheds for maintenance or improvement of water and soil resources. Effects of vegetation and land management practices on water quality and quantity, erosion, and sedimentation. Prerequisite: R&RM 3013.

3991.† Cooperative Education. (Credit variable; 1-3 for each hour) This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to integrate academic study with work experience that is germane to their major or minor. Enrollment requires a two-semester minimum commitment that may be accomplished by 1) alternating semesters of full-time study with semesters of curriculum-related employment, or 2) enrolling in courses at least half-time (6 semester hours) and working part-time in parallel positions of curriculum-related employment. The department Cooperative Education advisor will supervise the student's experience and assign the final grade based on the student's final report which is required to complete the course. Students may participate in the Cooperative Education program for an unlimited number of semesters but a maximum of 6 hours credit may be counted toward a degree. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 semester hours which includes 12 hours in the major or minor discipline in which the Cooperative Education course is desired, minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the appropriate major or minor field, and department head approval. Field experience fee $50.

4123.† Range Improvement and Development. (2-2) Principles and practices associated with the development of rangelands for livestock and wildlife production. Study of grazing systems, facilities development, brush control, reseeding, fertilization, and burning to improve rangeland productivity. Prerequisite: R&RM 3013 or consent of instructor. Lab fee $2.

4163.† Range Analysis and Planning. (2-2) Methods and applications of sampling, describing, and evaluating range plant communities with emphasis on inventory and monitoring programs for private and public lands. Application of biometrics to inventory data. Prerequisite: R&RM 3013 or consent of instructor. Lab fee $2.

4846.† Internship. (1-16) An approved, supervised, comprehensive work experience consisting of a minimum of 240 hours (6 weeks) for career preparation in a public, commercial, or private range-related enterprise or ranching operation. Prerequisites: Senior or junior classification and approval of academic advisor and department head. Field experience fee $50.

4863.† Problems in Range Management. (Credit variable) Individualized or small group studies of current topics applicable to the management of rangeland with emphasis on the studentís specific major and interests. Prerequisites: Senior classification and advance approval by instructor of record.

5153.† Rangeland Ecosystems. (3-0) Specialized study of rangeland ecosystems with emphasis on herbivory as an ecological process. An in-depth review of assessment methodology, trends in research, and current ecological issues. Prerequisites: R&RM 3153 and 4163 and graduate classification.

5863.† Range Management Problems. (Credit variable) Advanced independent or group study of selected range management problems or topics. Credit hours dependent on scope and depth of study. Enrollment must be approved in advance by supervising instructor.

READING (RDG)

1003.† Basic Reading. (3-0) The study of ways a student may enhance existing reading and writing skills; evaluate and examine new theories of learning in relation to individual needs; develop problem solving abilities and critical thinking; acquire individual capacities for understanding oneself in relation to college expectations. The class will use relevant, pertinent materials designed to enrich a studentís background knowledge.

3113.† Fundamentals of Reading Instruction. (3-0) A survey of models of the reading process, research on oral and written language development, characteristics of emergent literacy, Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills, and instructional strategies that develop comprehension, vocabulary, and word identification skills. Prerequisite: nine hours required English.

3513.† Content Area Reading. (3-0) This course provides an understanding of factors which influence learning from content text and teaches specific instructional strategies which promote comprehension, vocabulary development, effective study strategies, and test-taking skills. Includes ways to modify text for diverse learners. Attention is given to the principles of research-based reading instruction. Prerequisite: nine hours required English.

3843.† Assessment and Instruction of Reading. (3-0) A field-based course that surveys informal and formal assessment procedures related to classroom reading instruction. Includes correlates of reading difficulty and instructional strategies for individualizing reading instruction. Prerequisites: RDG 3113 and Admission to Tarleton Teacher Education Program.

4093.† Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum. (3-0) Theory and instructional strategies for teaching the writing process in elementary and middle schools. Includes stages of the writing process, issues at the different grade levels, teaching with mini-lessons, early literacy, spelling, handwriting, developing listening skills, TAAS writing, and the use of childrenís literature to teach writing. Prerequisites: RDG 3113 and 3843, ENGL 3503, and concurrent enrollment in RDG 4103 and EDU 4303 or approval of department head.

4103.† Implementation of Classroom Reading Instruction. (3-0) A survey of state and national reading initiatives, approaches to teaching reading, procedures for organizing the elementary and middle school classrooms for reading instruction, research on effective reading-writing instruction, and roles of school personnel and parents in the school reading program. Prerequisites: RDG 3113 and 3843, ENGL 3503, and concurrent enrollment in RDG 4093 and EDU 4303 or approval of department head.

5723.† Language Arts for Today's Learner. (3-0) Examines research and strategies for implementing the reading/writing process in classrooms. Examines integrated curriculum, use of children's literature, classroom management and organization, evaluation, working with diverse learners, and developing support networks. Prerequisites: RDG 5733 or 9 hours of undergraduate reading courses or approval of department head.

5733.† Foundations of Reading. (3-0) Examines theoretical models of the reading process, historical perspectives on reading instruction, and language learning. Develops an understanding of the construction of reading theory and its relationship to instructional practices. Prerequisite: Elementary, secondary, or all-level certification or approval of department head.

5743.† Reading Resources and Materials. (3-0) Surveys a variety of print and non-print materials including content-area textbooks, trade books, and computer software. Includes evaluation of materials and application of reading principles to instruction in content areas. Prerequisite: RDG 5733 or 9 hours of undergraduate reading courses or approval of department head.

5753.† Reading Research and Assessment. (3-0) Examines methods and techniques employed in reading research and assessment. Includes a review of research and the development, implementation, and dissemination of classroom research. Explores the application of appropriate diagnostic and correctional procedures for elementary, secondary, and adult learners having difficulty reading. Includes clinical practice. Prerequisite: RDG 5733 or 9 hours of undergraduate reading courses or approval of department head.

5763.† Organization and Administration of Reading Programs. (3-0) Surveys state laws, trends and issues related to the administration of reading programs. Examines instructional issues and reading programs for pre-K through adult learners. Includes censorship issues, textbook/test adoption procedures, roles and responsibilities in the reading program, staff development, and change strategies. Prerequisite: RDG 5733 or 9 hours of undergraduate reading courses or approval of department head.

5863.† Problems. (Credit variable) Directed study of selected problems in reading. Prerequisite: Approval of department head.

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION (R E)

1013.† Survey of the Old Testament. (3-0) A survey of the content of the Old Testament in relation to the history of the Hebrews and their religious outlook on life, as well as the foundation of the coming of Jesus Christ.

1023.† Survey of the New Testament. (3-0) A survey of the content of the New Testament in relation to its historical background and basic Christian teachings.

2043.† Marriage and the Home. (3-0) A study of the institution of marriage, its problems, its foundations, and its prerequisites. Emphasis on the spiritual basis for building a Christian home.

2053.† The Life of Christ. (3-0) A study of the life, teaching, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ as revealed in the Gospels, with a brief study of the background and historical setting of the Gospels.

SOCIAL SCIENCES (SOSC)

3013.† Social Sciences Survey. (3-0) An interdisciplinary course emphasizing the relationships of history, political science, economics and the social sciences. Prerequisites: 9 hours of HIST, POLS, ECO or SOC.

SOCIAL WORK (SWK)

2073.† Social Welfare in America. (3-0) Provides a general introduction to human services in the United States. Emphasis is on services and programs directed at the most vulnerable populations in our society. Race, ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status are considered in an effort to understand the need for various human services and social welfare programs.

2083.† Introduction to Social Work. (3-0) Focuses on the profession of social work: historical development, values and ethics, and various aspects of practice with an emphasis on the generalist perspective and populations at risk.

3003.† Methods and Skills of Interviewing. (3-3) This pre-practice course will introduce students to the Generalist Social Work Practice Model. Beginning social work skills introduced include the principles of conducting a helping interview, including initial client contact, attending and listening, empathetic responses, exploration and elaboration, questioning, gaining cooperation, self-disclosure, and termination. Issues of problem solving with diverse populations and persons from different cultural backgrounds as well as ethical issues of helping relationships are explored. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in SWK 2083.

3033.† Sociology of American Multi-Culture. (3-0) This course will familiarize the student with the cultural roots of the diverse ethnic groups which make up American society, tracing the process of acculturation which characterizes their American experience. Credit for both SWK 3033 and SOC 3033 will not be awarded.

3053.† Social Welfare Policy. (3-0) A study of social welfare as societyís response to the needs of individuals, groups, and communities; a historical review of policy development reflecting societyís changing values; policy analysis to determine impact on various systems including populations at risk; role of social policy in promoting social justice and social change. Prerequisite: SWK 2073 or concurrent enrollment.

3103.† Sociology of Aging. (3-0) A study of sociological and philosophical considerations regarding the changing stereotype role, family structure, and situation of aging, as well as community programs and counseling techniques. Prerequisite: SOC 2013 or approval of the Director of the Social Work Program.

3113.† Social Issues. (3-0) Utilizes major theoretical perspectives from sociology to explore causes and consequences of contemporary social issues in American society such as alienation, family stresses, poverty, unemployment and technological change.

3143.† Methods of Social Work Research (3-0) Principles of the scientific method for building knowledge of and evaluating practice. Topics include: ethical and cultural issues in research; research design and methodology; quantitative and qualitative research strategies; evaluation of practice; critical evaluation of published research; and completion and reporting of research projects.

3163.† Social Work Methods: Micro-Intervention. (3-0) The beginning practice course that focuses on the theories and basic processes of social work at the micro-level. This course examines the skills and values needed for generalist practice with individuals and families. Prerequisites: Admission to the Social Work Program and completion of SWK 3003.

3203.† Service Learning. (variable 1-3) Each student will identify and respond to a community/neighborhood challenge through volunteer, service learning work with a non-profit community agency and/or under direct supervision of the instructor. Volunteer work may be accomplished in the studentís home neighborhood or community. Students will engage in supervised individual hours of service activities and have the opportunity to reflect on the responses to those problems.

3293.† Human Behavior and Social Environment I. (3-0) Using systems theory as an organizing perspective, this course provides an integrated look at the bio-psycho-social factors influencing human development. Cultural factors affecting human functioning, as well as implications for social work practice are explored. Prerequisites: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in SWK 3003, PSY 1013, SOC 2013, and a course in human biology (BIOL 2194 & 2204 or PSY 4123).

3393.† Human Behavior and Social Environment II. (3-0) This course is a continuation of Human Behavior and Social Environment I with emphasis on theories and knowledge about the range of social systems in which individuals live and the ways in which systems deter people from achieving well-being. Values and ethical issues related to bio-psycho-social theories are included. Prerequisite: SWK 3293.

3773.† Alcohol and Drug Abuse. (3-0) Focus on psychoactive substances of use and abuse including: alcohol, legal/illegal drugs, and their impact on individuals, families, and society. Models of addiction, societyís attitudes, and services for persons and families are explored.

4103.† Social Work Methods: Mezzo-Intervention. (3-0) Building upon the generalist model of social work, this practice course explores the theories and dynamics of group behavior and the techniques of working with and within diverse groups in a variety of community and organizational contexts. Students will learn to assess group interaction patterns, individual change through group process, ethical issues and their own group facilitation skills. Prerequisite: SWK 3163 or permission of the Director of the Social Work Program. Course fee $20.

4123.† Social Work Methods: Macro-Intervention. (3-0) This course is designed to provide theoretical knowledge and a skill base for beginning generalist social work practice with large systems, specifically communities and organizations. Course material will emphasize how these systems operate and techniques of effective change in the context of practice knowledge, values, and skills. Prerequisite: SWK 4103. Course fee $20.

4226.† Field Placement I. (3-16) A field experience that provides the student with the opportunity to integrate theory and develop skills in an agency-based, educationally directed, professionally supervised experience in a social work practice setting. A minimum of 225 hours required to be completed and participation in a three-hour-per week seminar. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the field program and completion of SWK 2073, 3163, and 3393. Field experience fee $50.

4236.† Field Placement II. (3-16) A continuation of SWK 4226 with emphasis on generalist social work practice and on the interrelationships among human behavior, social policy, research, and practice. A minimum of 225 hours required to be completed and participation in a three-hour-per week seminar. Prerequisites: Completion of SWK 4226 with a grade of C or better. Field experience fee $50.

4303.† Senior Seminar. (3-0) Reviews topics including professional identity, professional and personal ethics, transition and preparation for employment and/or graduate school, and the integration of theory and practice.

4523.† Womenís Issues. (3-0) Examines the role of women from a global perspective. Focuses on specific issues that affect the everyday lives of women. Special attention is given to the differential and unequal treatment of women based on age, race, social class, and cultural differences.

4596.† International Social Work. (6-0) Provides students with an understanding of social work practice and social welfare policies from an international perspective. The implications of globalization and its impact on social welfare policies and social work practice will be examined. Strategies for inter-cultural social work practice and methods of combating discrimination also will be examined. Students may have the opportunity to travel outside the U.S. in order to become familiar with social welfare policies and programs from an international perspective. Approval of the Director of the Social Work Program is required prior to enrollment.

4853.† Social Work Seminar. (Credit variable; 1-0 for each hour) Intensive studies of current trends and issues related to professional social work practice, social service delivery, and populations at risk. May repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: Junior classification or approval of the Social Work Program Director.

4863.† Problems in Social Work. (Credit variable) Independent reading and research on various social work-related topics. Entry into the course will be arranged by Social Work Program Director.

SOCIOLOGY (SOC)

1013.† Cultural Anthropology. (3-0) A comparative study of culture, cultural patterns, and sociocultural change with the emphasis on preliterate societies.

2013.† Introduction to Sociology. (3-0) A general introduction to the concepts and elementary methods used in the study of society. Special attention is given to social organization, social stratification, social institutions, formal organizations, small groups, and social change.

2023.† Social Problems. (3-0) A study of several major problems facing contemporary society in such areas as family, mental health, crime and juvenile delinquency, racial and ethnic relationships. Prerequisite: SOC 2013.

2303.† Sociology of Sport and Leisure. (3-0) Social institution of sport and its consequences for American society. Course examines the social organization of activities such as play and professional sport. Also, violence, discrimination, women in sport, socialization, and implications from participation in sport.

3013.† Sociology of the Family. (3-0) A comparative study of the family as a social institution with emphasis on formation, functions, maintenance, child rearing, and family disorganization. Prerequisites: Junior classification and SOC 2013 or approval of the department head.

3033.† Sociology of American Multi-Culture. (3-0)This course will familiarize the student with the cultural roots of the diverse ethnic groups which make up American society, tracing the process of acculturation which characterizes their American experience. Credit for both SOC 3033 and SWK 3033 will not be awarded.

3043.† Medical Sociology. (3-0) This course explores how the sociology of health and illness are affected by social structure and cultural factors, including how these influence health and illness and peopleís perceptions of the same. Additionally, this course explores the concrete organizations that make up medical systems and how that system reflects the interests of doctors, insurance companies, pharmaceutical industries, hospitals, researchers, the government, and the consumer. Prerequisites: SOC 2013 or 2023 or approval of department head.

3053.† Criminology. (3-0) Theories of criminology and significant research on causes, extent, cost and ecology of crime; police, criminal, and juvenile courts; and prisons and reformatories. Course also focuses on prevention and rehabilitation. Credit for both C J 3053 and SOC 3053 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: SOC 2013 or approval of instructor.

3073.† Rural Sociology. (3-0) Adaptations of families to rural environments, farming, and other occupations; organizations, agencies, and institutions serving rural people; problems in delivering services to the country; and rural development and change. Prerequisites: Junior classification and SOC 2013 or instructor approval.

3103.† Sociology of Aging. (3-0) The study of the reciprocal relationship between society and those considered aged by society, utilizing concepts and theoretical frameworks applicable to that population group. The course also examines the social forces that impinge on the aging process, including socially constructed images of the aged, and patterns of inequality of gender, race, and economics. Credit for both SWK 3103 and SOC 3103 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: SOC 2013.

3203.† Social Stratification and Inequality. (3-0) The study of social inequality in human society, with emphasis on the social class structure of the United States, its origins, development, and consequences for the society and the individual. Prerequisite: SOC 2013 or approval of instructor.

3303.† Social Science Statistics. (3-0) Surveys the application of elementary forms of statistical processes, including central tendency, variation, the normal curve and Z scores, analysis of variance, regression analysis, and correlations, to social science data. The application of statistics will be made to the following areas: social work, sociology, criminal justice, political science, and gerontology. SPSS will be utilized for data analysis.

4023.† Methods of Social Research. (3-0) Principles and methods of social research, including research design, methods of observation, questionnaires, interviews, and other sources of social data; qualitative and quantitative techniques of inference; analysis and research report writing. Limited research studies and projects will be undertaken by the students. Prerequisites: Junior classification, SOC 2013 and 2023, or approval of department head.

4033.† Sociological Theory. (3-0) This course examines the major schools of sociological thought, including perspectives from both classic and contemporary sociological theory. Prerequisites: Junior classification, SOC 2013 or approval of department head.

4043.† Sociology of Religion. (3-0) An examination of the basic principles of religion, religious belief, and practice as a sociological concept. Attention will be given to the relationship of religion to the progress and stability of the social order. Prerequisite: SOC 2013 or approval of department head.

4053.† Social Psychology. (3-0) The scientific study of the influence of society, groups, culture, and other persons on the attitudes, behavior, and experiences of the individual. An examination of the total person as he or she functions in relation to the social environment. Prerequisites: Junior classification, SOC 2013 and 2023, or approval of department head.

4123.† Gender in Society. (3-0) Socialization to sex roles; male/female differences in family, work, and political behavior; male/female inequality; effects of gender in education and religion; and current changes in sex role definitions. Prerequisite: SOC 2013 and junior standing.

4133.† Social Development and Change. (3-0) This course focuses on social processes and social problems as they are contained in the highly interdependent world system. Social change and development stresses historical, comparative, and critical perspectives, and addresses the problem of how and why societies and cultures around the world change and whether those changes promote justice, equity, democracy, and development of human potential. Prerequisites: Junior standing and SOC 2013.

4853.† Sociology Seminar. (Credit variable) Independent reading, research, discussion, and paper writing under personal direction of instructor. Prerequisite: Senior classification or approval of department head. May be taken more than once for credit if topics vary.

4863.† Problems in Sociology. (Credit variable) Independent reading, research and discussion. Entry into this course will be arranged with the sociology counselor.

4993.† Sociology Internship. (0-8) Students assist the faculty supervisor with their placements in a social science related agency. At this agency, students will work 120 hours, acquiring professional skills while earning college credit. Students will attend seminars, keep a journal, and write a final internship report. Prerequisites: major in sociology, senior standing, and approval of the undergraduate advisor. Field experience fee $50.

SPANISH (SPAN)

1014.† Beginning Spanish I. (3-2) Introduction to the Spanish language for communication on a basic level. Applies the four-skills approach of reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Integrated classroom instruction and electronic language lab. Lab fee $5. Course fee $10.

1024.† Beginning Spanish II. (3-2) Continuation of four-skills introduction to the Spanish language for communication on a basic level. Integrated classroom instruction and electronic language lab. Prerequisite: SPAN 1014 or equivalent as approved by department head. Lab fee $5. Course fee $10.

1033.† Basic Spanish for Vocations. (3-0) Instruction and practice in understanding and speaking basic colloquial Spanish encountered in a particular occupational context such as farming, ranching, or law enforcement. May be taken for elective credit and may also satisfy specified program requirements.

1043.† Intermediate Spanish for Vocations. (3-0) Instruction and practice in understanding and speaking Spanish encountered in specific educational and occupational contexts. Prerequisite: SPAN 1014.

2013.† Intermediate Spanish I. (3-0) Review of basic language structure. Oral and written expression on an intermediate level. Prerequisite: SPAN 1024 or equivalent as approved by department head.

2023.† Intermediate Spanish II. (3-0) Intensive review of language and structure with continued practice in oral and written expression on an intermediate level. Prerequisite: SPAN 2013 or equivalent as approved by department head.

3033.† Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition. (3-0)Analysis of advanced Spanish grammar and development of more sophisticated writing skills. Prerequisite: SPAN 2023 or equivalent as approved by department head.

3063.† Spanish Conversation. (3-0) Emphasis on conversation fluency. Theme-based intensive practice in a wide range of applications to develop and enhance oral skills. Focus on informal settings rather than formal presentations. Prerequisites: successful completion of SPAN 2023 or equivalent as approved by department head; completion of or concurrent enrollment in SPAN 3033 or approval of department head.

4003. Foundation in Literary Studies. (3-0) Introduction to the genres of Spanish literature and analysis of literary texts. Prerequisite: SPAN 3033 and 3063 or approval of department head.

4013.† Survey of Peninsular Literature. (3-0) Major figures and literary movements of Spanish literature from the anonymous ďPoema del Mio CidĒ to the 20th century. Prerequisite: SPAN 4003 or approval of department head.

4023.† Survey of Spanish-American Literature. (3-0) An overview of the literature of the Spanish colonies to the 20th century. Prerequisite: SPAN 4003 or approval of department head.

4063.† Spanish and Spanish-American Culture. (3-0) An overview of history, literature, arts, and folklore of Spain and Spanish America. May be taken abroad. Prerequisites: SPAN 3033 and 3063 or approval of department head.

4073.† Advanced Oral and Writing Skills. (3-0) This course provides practice of both speaking and writing in the Spanish language, building on the skills acquired in SPAN 3033 and 3063. The language functions will be practiced at the advanced level required for the Texas Oral Proficiency Test (TOPT). Prerequisites: SPAN 3033 and 3063.

4853.† Spanish Seminar. (Credit variable; 1-0 for each hour)Studies in Spanish or Spanish-American texts. When topics vary, course may be taken for credit more than once. Prerequisite: SPAN 4003 or approval of department head.

4863.† Special Problems. (Credit variable) A course featuring independent reading, research, and discussion under personal direction of the instructor. Topics vary according to student needs. Prerequisite: SPAN 3033 and 3063 and approval of department head.

SPECIAL EDUCATION (EDSP)

3613.† Survey of Exceptional Learners. (3-0) The characteristics of exceptional learners and the educational programs for individuals with disabilities will be surveyed. Additional course content will include the legislation and court cases related to special education and the referral, diagnosis, and placement of exceptional learners. A field experience is required. Prerequisite: TASP requirement must be met.

3623.† Assessment of Exceptional Learners. (3-0) Students will learn to administer and interpret formal and informal assessment instruments. Processes used by educators to determine educational goals, placements, and programs for exceptional learners will be studied. A field experience is required. Prerequisite: EDSP 3613 or approval of department head.

4623.† Special Education Rules and Regulations for Teachers. (3-0) Laws and litigation that affect the education of students with disabilities are examined. Includes procedures pertinent to teachers providing special education services such as federal and state regulations, IEPs, and the development of basic instructional plans. Field experience required. Prerequisite: EDSP 3613.

4633.† Teaching Learners with Learning Disabilities. (3-0) Learning disabilities are examined with emphasis on history, definition, causation and characteristics. Content includes teaching methods for language, academic, and social skills as well as effective inclusive practices. Strategies for successful collaboration with parents, guardians, paraprofessionals and general education teachers are studied. Field experience required. Prerequisite: EDSP 3613.

4643.† Teaching Learners with Developmental Disabilities. (3-0) Etiology and characteristics associated with deficits in development are studied. Effects of developmental disabilities in the areas of language acquisition and physical, social and emotional functioning are examined. Course content includes methods for teaching functional academic skills, communication skills and life management skills, working with parents, paraprofessionals and related service personnel, community based instruction and vocational planning.† Field experience required. Prerequisite: EDSP 3613.

4653.† Behavior Management for Exceptional Learners. (3-0) Information is provided on managing a classroom that includes students with disabilities. Topics include creating positive interpersonal relationships in the classroom, increasing student motivation and learning, minimizing disruptive behavior, behavioral management strategies, curriculum adaptations, crisis management and behavior management theories and strategies. Information will also be provided on the typical characteristics associated with emotional disabilities and identification procedures utilized. Field experience required. Prerequisite: EDSP 3613.

4663.† Curriculum Methods for Exceptional Learners. (3-0) Methods and approaches for adapting educational processes for students with disabilities. Emphasis on specialized teaching methods, preparation of materials, use of technology for adapting instruction and developing modifications and accommodations for the general education curriculum. Field experience required. Prerequisites: EDSP 3613, 3623.

4673.† Programming for Young Children with Disabilities. (3-0) Study of young children with disabilities aged birth to 6 with an emphasis on the techniques for implementing programs to meet the needs of the child and the family. Early intervention, medical intervention, and public school educational programming for at-risk infants, toddlers, and young children will be addressed as well as parent involvement models to promote optimum parent-child and parentĖprofessional relationships. Emphasis on recent research related to early childhood special education. Field experience required. Prerequisite: EDSP 3613.

5053.† Introduction to Exceptional Learners. (3-0) A survey of learner characteristics and an examination of instructional techniques that promote academic, personal, and social growth in exceptional learners and an examination of the process and procedures relating to the placement of exceptional learners. Prerequisite: 18 hours of professional education or certification.

5253.† Appraisal of Exceptional Learners. (3-2) Standardized assessment of the academic achievement of students referred for or currently receiving special education services including test administration, analysis, and reporting of scores, and program planning. Prerequisites: CNSL 5233 or PSY 5013 or concurrent enrollment or approval of department head.

5273.† Teaching Students with Severe to Profound Disabilities. (3-0) Definitions, characteristics, and instructional techniques for students with severe and profound disabilities, including functional assessment, applied behavioral analysis, Individualized Education Program (IEP) goals and objectives, transition and placement issues. Prerequisite: EDSP 5053 or approval of department head.

5293.† Assessing Cognitive Abilities of Exceptional Learners. (3-2) Standardized assessment of the cognitive and adaptive behavior abilities of exceptional students. Includes test administration, scoring, analysis, and program planning. Prerequisite: CNSL 5233 or PSY 5813 or approval of department head. Lab fee $25.

5993.† Internship for Educational Diagnosticians. (1-7) Supervised professional activities for persons preparing for certification as an educational diagnostician. Professional activities will include test administration, scoring, analysis, diagnosis, report writing, and program planning. Interns will be required to demonstrate competence in the performance of professional duties as an educational diagnostician. A minimum of 300 hours of documented related professional activities will be required. Prerequisites: EDSP 5053, 5253, 5273, and 5293 or approval of department head. Field experience fee $50.

THEATRE (THEA)

1053.† Introduction to the Theatre. (3-0) A beginning theatre course providing a survey of the fields of theatre activity. The course provides an introductory knowledge of all phases of drama: literature, performance, theatre plants, design, costuming, and types of drama. Participation in a college theatre production is encouraged.

1063.† Acting I. (2-3) Introduction to the art of acting through basic theory and technique. Participation in college theatre production is encouraged.

1072.† Rehearsal and Performance. (1-4) Participation in and analysis of one or more full-length plays, reader's theatre, forensics, and an evening of interpretation and/or television production under the direction of a departmental staff member during a semester. May be taken up to 3 times as course content changes.

1081.† Production Crafts Practicum. (0-3) Construction of scenery in a laboratory situation and through theatrical and television production. May be taken up to 3 times for credit.

1093.† Theatrical Make-Up. (2-3) Design and application of make-up for the stage; areas explored include theory, color, character analysis, materials, old age, three-dimensional, and fantasy make-up.

2013.† Voice and Performance. (3-0) Oral presentation of literary forms with emphasis on the vocal mechanism and phonetics. Interpretative readings in prose, poetry, and drama are directed to help students gain a sensitivity to literary genre and develop effective speech habits through vocal analysis, guided practice, and class drills emphasizing pronunciation, enunciation, and articulation. Credit for both THEA 2013 and COMS 2013 will not be awarded.††††††††††

2033.† Technical Theatre I. (2-3) The study of technical procedures employed in planning, building, painting, and lighting scenery. Backstage participation in play production as an active set builder and crew member will be required. Stage lighting will be approached from its practical and aesthetic value as a contributing factor to production. Prerequisite: 6 hrs of THEA courses or equivalent experience. Lab fee $10.

2043.† Technical Theatre II. (2-3) The study of make-up and theatrical costume and their application in contemporary theatre. Theory on costume and makeup will be applied in laboratory situations and through theatrical production. Prerequisite: THEA 2033 or approval of department head. Lab fee $10.

2063.† Acting II. (2-3) An analytical approach to acting with emphasis on techniques of characterization, stage presence, and movement. Special attention will be given to the role of the actor as an integral member of an ensemble effort. Theories of acting and of acting styles will also be studied. Participation in a college theatre production is encouraged. Prerequisite: THEA 1063 or approval of department head.

2073.† History of the Theatre I. (3-0) Theatre from its origins to 1750; plays, playwrights, actors, costumes, scenic arts of each period as related to events of period and to contemporary theatre.

2083.† History of the Theatre II. (3-0) Theatre since 1750; plays, playwrights, actors, costumes, scenic arts of each period as related to events of period and to contemporary theatre. Prerequisite: THEA 2073 or approval of department head.

3003.† Scene Design and Construction. (2-3) The study of the elements of a design used to capture mood, atmosphere, and idea of a play; designing to scale, and drawing ground plans and elevations; technical elements of scene construction. Students must work set crew for theatrical production as laboratory.

3013.† Costume Design and Construction. (2-3) Studies in stage costuming; history, characterization, fabrics, construction and design. A lecture and laboratory course including student planning, illustration, construction, and designing of costumes for University productions. Prerequisite: Technical Theatre II or equivalent experience.

3023.† Directing I. (2-3) Basic techniques for the stage including scene interpretation, pictorial composition, movement and rehearsal routine. Students will direct and supervise production of short plays.

3033.† Lighting for the Theatre. (2-3) History and techniques of lighting for the stage. Major emphasis is placed on design and practical application. Prerequisite: Technical Theatre I or equivalent experience. Lab fee $10.

3043.† Sound for the Theatre. (2-3) Techniques of sound for the stage, including multi-track recording, editing, and the study of microphones. Major emphasis is placed on practical application. Prerequisites: THEA 2033 or equivalent experience. Lab fee $10.

4003.† Shakespeare. (3-0) A study in depth of representative types of Shakespeare's dramas and poetry. Credit for both ENGL 4003 and THEA 4003 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: 12 hours of ENGL or approval of department head.

4043.† Theory and Criticism. (3-0) A study of the philosophy of aesthetics in theatre and the arts. From the works of various philosophers, directors and actors beginning with Aristotle to contemporary writers.

4073.† Theatre Management. (2-3) Theatre management, promotion, finances, organization, emphasis on contract negotiations, planning and use of facilities. A lecture-laboratory course applied to a producing theatre operation and plant. Lab fee $5.

4843.† Internship. (0-30) Minimum of 6 weeks of full-time experience with a professional theatre company approved by the department head. (May be repeated once for a total of 6 hours of academic credit.) Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of department head. Field experience fee $50.

4853.† Theatre Seminar. (Credit variable; 1-0 for each hour) Content varies according to the needs of students. When topic varies, course may be repeated for credit.

4863.† Theatre Problems. (Credit variable) A course featuring independent study in theatre. Research and discussion under personal direction of an instructor. Topics will vary according to student need. Open to students of senior classification with approval of department head.

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT (WLDM)

2013.† Avian Science. (2-2) An introduction to the study of birds, their structure, physiology, reproduction, ecology and behavior. Relates gamebird production and biology to basic ornithological principles. Laboratory covers production of game birds from conception and incubation to marketing and sales. Gamebirds studied are various quail, pheasant, partridge, and wild turkey species. Credit for both WLDM 2013 and ANSC 2013 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: Sophomore classification or approval of the department head. Course fee $10.

2213.† Wildlife Habitat and Range Management. (3-0) Introduction to wildlife and range resources of the United States with special reference to Texas. The importance of animals, forests, and range lands in our economic and cultural life; the symbiotic phenomena between wildlife and range/forest management. Credit for both R&RM 2213 and WLDM 2213 will not be awarded. Course fee $5.

3103.† Wildlife Management Techniques. (2-2) Field and laboratory techniques used in wildlife management and research. Determining age and food habits, population analysis, habitat analysis, and introduction to research. Credit for both R&RM 3103 and WLDM 3103 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: WLDM 2213. Modest costs of field trips will be borne by the student. Course fee $5.

3113.† Wildlife Diseases. (3-0) Basic mechanisms of diseases as they occur in wildlife populations; interplay of habitat requirements, individual physiological requirements and disease producing mechanisms of varied wildlife species. Control/Prevention of infectious, non-infectious, parasitic diseases and parasites. Prerequisite: WLDM 2213 and sophomore classification or approval of department head. Course fee $5.

3753.† Conservation of Natural Resources. (3-0) Principles and philosophies associated with the development, management, and use of natural resources are studied in the relationship to the ecological and social implications inherent in management alternatives involving the natural environment and use of renewable natural resources. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Course fee $5.

3853.† Fish and Wildlife Laws and Administration. (3-0) A review and analysis of state and federal laws and international treaties and conventions affecting fish and wildlife; their application and administration. The organizational structure of state, federal and international agencies; their objectives, policies and practices. Prerequisite: WLDM 2213 and junior classification. Course fee $5.

3996.† Cooperative Education. (0-6) This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to integrate academic study with work experience that is germane to their major or minor. Enrollment requires a two-semester minimum commitment that may be accomplished by 1) alternating semesters of full-time study with semester of curriculum-related employment, or 2) enrolling in courses at least half-time (6 semester hours) and working part-time in parallel position of curriculum-related employment. The department Cooperative Education advisor will supervise the studentís experience and assign the final grade based on the studentís final report, which is required to complete the course. Students may participate in the Cooperative Education program for an unlimited number of semesters but a maximum of 6 hours credit may be counted toward a degree. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 semester hours which includes 12 hours in the major or minor discipline in which the Cooperative Education course is desired, minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the appropriate major or minor field, and department head approval. Field experience fee $50.

4053.† Urban Wildlife and Fisheries. (3-0) Urban wildlife and fisheries trains students to establish and maintain diverse, self-sustaining urban wildlife and fish populations at levels in harmony with ecological, social, and economic values of the human community and to develop optimal levels of public appreciation and use of urban wildlife and fish resources and associated habitats. Includes discussions on conservation education as a tool for furthering urban wildlife and fisheries appreciation. Prerequisites: WLDM 2213, 3103, 3753 or approval of department head. Course fee $5.

4253.† Cervidae Agriculture. (2-2) A study of current management strategies employed on deer farms in North America with a focus on the Texas deer industry and impacts on traditional wildlife management. The biology and ecology of deer will be studied in addition to breed and stock selection, velvet antler and venison production, stress and behavior management, and reproduction of deer species. Primary species of interest will be elk, red deer, fallow deer, and white-tailed deer but other exotic ungulate species will also be discussed. Credit for both ANSC 4253 and WLDM 4253 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: WLDM 2213 and 8 hours of advanced ANSC/WLDM or approval of the department head. Modest cost of field trips will be borne by the student. Course fee $5.

4843.   Internship. (0-6) Formally arranged and approved on-the-job training with a cooperating sponsor in government or private sector of the wildlife management or natural resources field. A minimum of 40 hours of training is required for each hour of academic credit. A maximum of six hours may be earned by internship completion. Oral and written reports of internship experience required. Prerequisite: Advanced standing and approval of department head. Field experience fee $50.

4851.   Seminar. (1-0) A review of current issues and developments in wildlife management and natural resources; professional opportunities and responsibilities; individual investigations and reports using scientific and popular literature. Prerequisites: WLDM 2213, 3103, 3753 and senior classification in WLDM.

4863.† Problems. (6-0) Individualized study of current topics in wildlife management, natural resource management or a supporting discipline. Specific content and credit depend upon studentís interests, needs, and depth of study. Maximum undergraduate credit, six semester hours. Prerequisite: Senior classification and advance approval by academic advisor.

4903.† Special Topics. (6-0) Selected topics in wildlife and natural resource management. May be repeated for credit when topics vary, with a maximum of six hours. Prerequisite: WLDM 2213, 3103, advanced classification and approval of department head.