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DME ORFF ASSIGNMENT

Each student will design an accompaniment to a song,

 which will be taught and then performed on Orff instruments

 

Grading Criteria

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lesson procedure - organization and flow

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ensemble outcome

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student accessibility

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appropriateness of accompaniment to song

 

Orff Rubric

Criteria

Performance Indicators

Failing

Needs Improvement

Acceptable

Good

Excellent

Composition

Complements the song

Accessible to students

0 points

14 points

16 points

18 points

20 points

Pre-lesson

Instruments effectively assigned

Instruments correctly named

0 points

7 points

8 points

9 points

10 points

Rote technique

Instructions clear

Demonstration effective

Problems effectively addressed

Accumulative

Flexible

0 points

21 points

24 points

27 points

30 points

Lesson

Includes responses 

Good pacing maintained to avoid downtime

Singers involved/engaged

Instruments used correctly

Competent control

You taught what you notated

0 points

14 points

16 points

18 points

20 points

Performance

Aesthetically pleasing outcome

Satisfying experience for students

0 points

7 points

8 points

9 points

10 points

Logistics

Instruments set up on time

Hand-out correct and usable

Instruments put away neatly

0 points

7 points

8 points

9 points

10 points

      

Total points

0

70

80

90

100


 

Procedure

 

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Choose a song. In a classroom setting, an Orff accompaniment would be added after the class had learned the song, so it is not necessary for you to teach the song.   Do not use a song that has already been used by another student in your class.  Make sure the song is age-appropriate to the grade level for which you  are preparing.  Begin with a proper range for the song.  Do not write your Orff accompaniment in a key that is out of range for the singers.

 

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Choose a grade level.  Review the Developmental Levels handout in order to choose an appropriate song and level of accompaniment.  Make sure the vocal part is in a comfortable range for your age group.

 

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Choose at least 4 instruments to accompany the song.  At least two of the instruments must be pitched instruments.  At least one of them must be a xylophone or metallophone.  One must be the instrument you drew at the beginning of the course.  You may supplement these with any of the classroom instruments in 112A.  They do not all have to be "Orff instruments."

 
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Make up a different part for each instrument.  Think "accompaniment", not just "sound effects". 

 

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Notate each part.  Remember that you will be able to use the notation for reference but the parts must be taught to your "students" by rote, so keep it simple.  Please notate on Finale.  Clearly label which instrument should play each line.  The vocal part should be the first line.

 

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Compile your lesson on one sheet.  Include on this sheet your name, the name of the song, the words to the song and the notation to your accompaniment.  If your song is too long for one page after you have tried scaling the size down, you may put it on 2 facing pages.  Do not leave the score in Finale's default size.  See the Finale page for instructions on how to scale down the size of the score.  85% is a good place to start.  Use percussion notation for non-pitched instruments.  Make copies of this sheet (with holes punched) for all class members and for me.

 

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Set up the instruments you have chosen before class begins on the day your assignment is due.

 
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Choose your players when it is time for your lesson to begin.  This should be a random choice based on our discussion of "volunteers."   It is even possible to place 2 students on the larger instruments, or to have more than one student playing identical instruments.  Name the instruments as they are assigned.

 

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Have another student pass out copies of your lesson while you are assigning instruments to your players.  That student should also make sure that the instrumentalists receive a copy of the lesson after they have performed.

 
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Teach the instrument parts  quickly by rote to your instrumentalists.   Feel free to give them visual cues (changing notes on your cue, etc.), numbers of beats to count before changing notes, or associations to words in the song.  A good process is to add instruments as opposed to teaching all parts first.  Be prepared to keep the rest of the class engaged/participating while the instrumentalists are learning their parts.

 
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Lead the entire class through the song. Those students not chosen to accompany will sing the words to the song.  Part of the lesson will be leading the singing students, as well.  It often works well to start the instrumental accompaniment and then bring in the singers.  It may depend on the nature of your accompaniment and upon the song.  See me if you need advice.  This entire process should not take longer than 10-15 minutes.

 

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Put all instruments away after class.  Make sure they are in the correct slots whether you found them there or not and that no chromatic bars are left on the instruments.

 

 

Hints

 
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Use repetition  Since everything will be taught by rote, make it simple.  Devise a rhythmic motive of 2, 4 or 8 beats and repeat.  Ostinatos work well.  Rhythmic patterns don't have to sound simple.  The most difficult parts are those without enough repetition or pattern, because they are hard to remember.  See p. 208 in your textbook for some examples.

 

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Use the concept of a Coda to break a pattern at the end or to explain how to come to a stop together.

 
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Use words to teach rhythms  "huckleberry" for 4 16th notes, or a phrase like "Old MacDonald had a farm" for ti-ti-ti-ti-ti-ti-ta

 

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Attach changes to words in the song  When harmonic changes in the song require a pitch position shift (from C-G ostinato to G-D, for example), the player can be instructed to change when a certain word comes up in the song.  For example, in the song "Skip to My Lou", the player can be instructed to alternate between the above 2 patterns on the following words:

"Flies"

"Flies"

"Flies"

"Skip"

"Darling"

Four changes achieved by knowing the words to the song.

 

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Use conducting cues to achieve harmonic changes as above.   Cue (point) to the student to signal a change.  Make sure you give preparatory time when cueing.

 

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Do NOT leave the rest of the class idle for long periods while you teach the accompaniment parts.  Plan a strategy to keep the singers also engaged.

 

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Be aware that if you plan to use contrabass bars, we only have C, D, F, and G.  Plan the key of your piece accordingly.

 

 

INSTRUMENTS

 
Xylophones

Soprano, Alto and Bass

 

 

 

Metallophones

Soprano, Alto and Bass

 

 

Glockenspiels

Soprano and alto

 

Rhythm Sticks
Claves
Wood Block w/Mallet
Tick Tock w/Mallet
Guiro w/Scraper
Castanet
Jingle Tap
Loop Bells
Tap-a-Tap
Sand Blocks
Maracas
Cow Bell w/Mallet
Triangle w/Striker
Tone Block w/Mallet
Suspended Cymbal w/Mallet
Crash Cymbals
Finger Cymbals
Kids Tambourine
Whip
Cabasa
Shaker
Handle Bells
Train Whistle
Giant Sleigh Bell Hoop
Vibra Slap
Agogo Bells
Flex-a-Tone
Wood Block
Jingle Sticks
Monk Bell
Kokiriko
Ratchet
African Rattle
Maracas (wood)
Wood Guiro
Afuche
Plastic Castanets
Castanet
Slide Whistle
Siren
Bell Tree

Rainmaker

(Rain stick)

Power Tambourine
Tambourine (plastic)
Tambourine (wood)

Frame Drum

(Hand drum)

Steel Drum
  
 
 
Bongos
  
Temple blocks
  
Djembe
  
Talking Drum
 
Autoharp
 
Conga Drum
 

 

 

 

Slit Log Drum with Mallets

 
Native American Tom Tom Drums w/Mallet
Single Sided Hoop Drums w/Mallet
 

 

 

 

 

 

Hand Drum Tunable w/Mallet
Ten-Inch Tunable Tambourine
Tom Tom Drum w/Mallet
2 Headed Drum w/Mallet
2 Headed Tack Head Bongo
2 Headed Deluxe Tunable Bongo
Conga w/Adjustable Strap
Brass Gong w/Stand and Mallet
Tom Boy w/Mallet
Indian Drum w/Mallets & Neck Cord
Power Fish Tambourine

 

 

 

 

 

Created and maintained by Vicky V. Johnson

 

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